Actual Killer Dream Outbreak - Real Life Inspiration for Freddy Krueger subtitles

A piercing scream wakes you up in the middle of the night.You turn to your wife, who has also jolted awake from the horrific noise, and tell heryou’ll sort things out.Your son has been suffering from terrible nightmares recently, to the point where hesometimes refuses to sleep altogether.Looks like it’s another one of those nights.You rush down the hallway to his room, hoping you don’t have to stay up all night consolinghim again.The kid is a real handful, but he’s been through a lot over the last few months.You can only hope that what happened in Cambodia won’t haunt him for the rest of his life.You enter your son’s bedroom, expecting to find him sitting up in bed and trembling.Instead, he’s lying down and motionless.Weird.You approach his body, calling his name, but he doesn’t react.Maybe he already fell asleep again.But something’s wrong.Is he even breathing?Panicking, you check his pulse.You can’t find it.And he’s definitely not breathing either.How could this be possible?Just a few hours ago, he was fine.It’s like he died in his nightmare.Now, it’s you that lets out a scream.If you’re planning on sleeping soon, stop this video now.This gruesome tale will keep you tossing and turning for the entire night...Living in Cambodia from 1975 to 1979 was enough to give anyone nightmares.The reign of dictator Pol Pot and his party, Khmer Rouge, was filled with terror and tragedy.Over the four years the party had power, almost two million people from various minority groupsdied.That’s around a quarter of the population, making it one of the world’s worst genocidesever.Those who died under Pol Pot’s reign were buried in the Killing Fields: the chillingname for mass graveyards containing victims.Others escaped as refugees.But little did they know that many of them would face circumstances almost as terrifyingwhen they arrived in the places offering them refuge.Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, many people died in their sleep after having nightmares.The strangest part is, they all had one thing in common: they were male refugees from SouthEast Asia who fled from the Killing Fields to the USA.American dream?More like an American nightmare.The phenomenon became so prevalent that it was known as the Asian Death Syndrome at thetime.We’re yet to understand it fully.One day in 1981, medics arrived at a refugee camp in the US after hearing that a man washaving some kind of fit in his sleep.They found his heart contracting wildly as if he had a heart condition or was in fear.But nobody knew who or what he was afraid of.He was asleep, after all.The medics did everything they could to save the man’s life, but they watched him passaway in front of their eyes.The case was as mysterious as it was sad — the victim was healthy, reasonably young, andhad just died for no apparent reason.But part of the puzzle may have been his home country: the man was from Laos.See, it wasn’t just the Cambodians that were going through a hard time during the70s and 80s.In Laos, the CIA had recruited the Hmong — an ethnic group in the area — to fight NorthVietnamese soldiers in the Vietnam War.As if the Hmong didn’t have things bad enough by being disproportionately killed duringthe war — the Hmong soldiers died ten times more often than their US counterparts — theyalso ended up being persecuted in their own country.When Laos became Communist, it saw the Hmong soldiers as traitors for fighting againstVietnam.Many ended up fleeing to the US, along with refugees from Cambodia and Vietnam.In fact, the patient who died in a refugee camp under the supervision of medics was thefourth Hmong man to die in the US over a nine-month period.And, between 1981 and 1988, more than a hundred men from Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia diedmysteriously in their sleep.It might have just been a coincidence, but it’s pretty unusual for healthy and youngpeople to die in their sleep with no explanation.Almost everyone who died was in their 20s and 30s.Even more creepily, almost all the victims were men and boys.Only one female died.What was it about young Asian males?And the story of one young boy makes the whole situation sound even more ominous than italready does….If you’re even mildly into horror movies, this story might sound familiar.That’s because the mysterious so-called Asian Death Syndrome became the inspirationfor A Nightmare on Elm Street.After the film director Wes Craven heard the story in the news one day, he realized itwould make the perfect plot for a horror film.So, if you ever watch the film and Freddy Krueger is freaking you out, it’s no usereassuring yourself that it’s “just a story.”Sorry, but no it ain’t.Whilst I’m at it, I may as well hurl some more creepy facts at you.Kraven also based the character of Freddy Krueger on two people he knew in real life.The name Freddy Krueger was inspired by a childhood bully, Fred Kruge, who tormentedCraven when he was a child.And his appearance and overall vibe came about after Kraven was a boy at home one day andsaw a strange-looking old man walk past.The two locked eyes, and bizarrely, the man came closer and stood outside his window,staring at him.After a few tense moments, the old man walked away, but he obviously left a lasting impression.Damn, and I thought I had a twisted sense of humor.But back to the killer dream outbreak.The story about the man who died in his sleep might have been mysterious, but it’s nowherenear as chilling as this one.A Cambodian family fled from the genocide to the United States in the 1970s, ready tostart a new life.There was just one problem: the son started having nightmares.Just like the beginning of many good horror movies.The boy dreamed of being chased and woke up terrified.We’ve all had creepy dreams about someone running after us, but I guess his were a notchabove the standard nightmare, because they freaked him out so much that he avoided sleepingaltogether.Literally, he’d force himself to go days on end without sleeping.He must have drunk a lot of coffee.His parents were concerned, for obvious reasons.They tried to coax him into sleeping, to no avail.This kid was convinced that, if he fell asleep, he’d die.From an outsider’s perspective, it all sounds a bit melodramatic.Maybe the kid needed some attention from his parents or something.But bizarrely, it turned out that he wasn’t overreacting.No matter how much double Espresso you drink, you will eventually need to sleep.Well, despite his determination, this boy was no exception.One day, he fell asleep.His parents were relieved, thinking they could finally convince him he was safe whilst heslept and the demons from his dreams could never hurt him in real life.Oh, the irony.Rinse and repeat — the boy fell asleep, he had a nightmare, and he started screaming.His parents rushed in to comfort him — only to find out that he’d already died.Incredibly, his nightmare had killed him, just like the other hundred men from Laos,Cambodia, and Vietnam.It made the perfect plot for a horror film — a young child who sensed danger and logicaladults who refused to believe his absurd theories.But how was it possible that a young boy could die in his sleep?Surely there’s a logical explanation that doesn’t involve a demon like Freddy Krueger?Investigators tried and failed to find a medical cause of the deaths.They found some links with an irregular heartbeat, but nobody knew what the cause of the irregularheartbeat was.Since then, there have been a few more theories.One explanation was that the refugees were exposed to chemical nerve agents used duringthe Vietnam war.It sounds mildly logical, but no doctors could find any actual evidence for it.Besides, even if the idea made some scientific sense — which it didn’t — it failedto explain why the nerve agent would only affect males and only during the night.Another idea was that the night terrors were a symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder,provoked by the horrific experiences of the refugees and the unfamiliar world they enteredin the USA.But again, even though this makes some sense, there was no proper evidence for it and noexplanation why females didn’t also suffer from PTSD.So, back to the drawing board.Ever heard that old wive’s tale that if we die in a dream then we also die in reallife, so we always wake up from nightmares a few fractions of a second before we’reabout to die?Sorry to disappoint — or maybe it’s a source of relief — but that’s not true.It’s true that, when things happen in a dream, they can trigger us to have the samephysiological reactions in our waking state.Kind of like when you’re screaming in your dream then you wake up to find you’re reallyscreaming.Or when you urinate in your dream and then you wake up and realize you — oh, come on,please say it’s not just me.Basically, it’s theoretically possible that a dream could trigger a physiological reactionthat ends with you dying.When people die suddenly in their sleep, it’s put down to Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal DeathSyndrome.There’s a nice piece of medical jargon for you.Some academic studies think this phenomenon could be biological or genetic, explainingwhy people of the same ethnicity, age, and sex died.Also known as Brugada syndrome, the disease is actually the most common cause of naturaldeath amongst the young, healthy Asian population.It’s a rare heart rhythm disorder that can lead to sudden cardiac arrest, meaning a lossof heart function, breathing, and consciousness.It can happen whilst people are awake, but is most fatal whilst they’re sleeping.Yeah, I know.A rare genetic disease is kind of an anticlimax compared to a spooky grim reaper enteringkids’ nightmares.But we still don’t know everything.Since the peak in the mid and late 1980s, deaths from Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal DeathSyndrome, Brugada syndrome, or whatever else you want to call it, have decreased sharply.Nobody can fully explain the decrease, so we can’t rule out any funny business orgrim reapers quite yet.Anyway, it’s getting late.Time to get some sleep...Or, check out our videos “scientists reveal how dreams can kill you in real life” or“night hag, the demon that visits you in your sleep.”

Actual Killer Dream Outbreak - Real Life Inspiration for Freddy Krueger

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<text sub="clublinks" start="0.25" dur="2.669">A piercing scream wakes you up in the middle of the night.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="2.919" dur="4.531">You turn to your wife, who has also jolted awake from the horrific noise, and tell her</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="7.45" dur="1">you’ll sort things out.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="8.45" dur="3.75">Your son has been suffering from terrible nightmares recently, to the point where he</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="12.2" dur="2.399">sometimes refuses to sleep altogether.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="14.599" dur="2.471">Looks like it’s another one of those nights.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="17.07" dur="4.049">You rush down the hallway to his room, hoping you don’t have to stay up all night consoling</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="21.119" dur="1">him again.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="22.119" dur="3.451">The kid is a real handful, but he’s been through a lot over the last few months.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="25.57" dur="4.32">You can only hope that what happened in Cambodia won’t haunt him for the rest of his life.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="29.89" dur="3.96">You enter your son’s bedroom, expecting to find him sitting up in bed and trembling.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="33.85" dur="2.619">Instead, he’s lying down and motionless.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="36.469" dur="1">Weird.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="37.469" dur="3.061">You approach his body, calling his name, but he doesn’t react.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="40.53" dur="1.75">Maybe he already fell asleep again.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="42.28" dur="1.45">But something’s wrong.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="43.73" dur="1.04">Is he even breathing?</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="44.77" dur="1.6">Panicking, you check his pulse.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="46.37" dur="1.04">You can’t find it.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="47.41" dur="1.78">And he’s definitely not breathing either.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="49.19" dur="1.38">How could this be possible?</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="50.57" dur="1.579">Just a few hours ago, he was fine.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="52.149" dur="1.82">It’s like he died in his nightmare.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="53.969" dur="2.801">Now, it’s you that lets out a scream.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="56.77" dur="3.53">If you’re planning on sleeping soon, stop this video now.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="60.3" dur="3.95">This gruesome tale will keep you tossing and turning for the entire night...</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="64.25" dur="5.86">Living in Cambodia from 1975 to 1979 was enough to give anyone nightmares.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="70.11" dur="5.74">The reign of dictator Pol Pot and his party, Khmer Rouge, was filled with terror and tragedy.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="75.85" dur="4.699">Over the four years the party had power, almost two million people from various minority groups</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="80.549" dur="1">died.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="81.549" dur="4.5">That’s around a quarter of the population, making it one of the world’s worst genocides</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="86.049" dur="1">ever.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="87.049" dur="3.561">Those who died under Pol Pot’s reign were buried in the Killing Fields: the chilling</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="90.61" dur="2.92">name for mass graveyards containing victims.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="93.53" dur="1.76">Others escaped as refugees.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="95.29" dur="3.97">But little did they know that many of them would face circumstances almost as terrifying</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="99.26" dur="3.08">when they arrived in the places offering them refuge.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="102.34" dur="4.1">Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, many people died in their sleep after having nightmares.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="106.44" dur="5.179">The strangest part is, they all had one thing in common: they were male refugees from South</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="111.619" dur="3.841">East Asia who fled from the Killing Fields to the USA.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="115.46" dur="1.29">American dream?</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="116.75" dur="1.59">More like an American nightmare.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="118.34" dur="4.629">The phenomenon became so prevalent that it was known as the Asian Death Syndrome at the</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="122.969" dur="1">time.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="123.969" dur="1.531">We’re yet to understand it fully.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="125.5" dur="4.75">One day in 1981, medics arrived at a refugee camp in the US after hearing that a man was</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="130.25" dur="2.23">having some kind of fit in his sleep.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="132.48" dur="4.66">They found his heart contracting wildly as if he had a heart condition or was in fear.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="137.14" dur="2.69">But nobody knew who or what he was afraid of.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="139.83" dur="1.85">He was asleep, after all.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="141.68" dur="3.99">The medics did everything they could to save the man’s life, but they watched him pass</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="145.67" dur="1.75">away in front of their eyes.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="147.42" dur="4.98">The case was as mysterious as it was sad — the victim was healthy, reasonably young, and</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="152.4" dur="2.8">had just died for no apparent reason.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="155.2" dur="3.85">But part of the puzzle may have been his home country: the man was from Laos.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="159.05" dur="4.07">See, it wasn’t just the Cambodians that were going through a hard time during the</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="163.12" dur="1">70s and 80s.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="164.12" dur="4.58">In Laos, the CIA had recruited the Hmong — an ethnic group in the area — to fight North</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="168.7" dur="2.49">Vietnamese soldiers in the Vietnam War.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="171.19" dur="3.85">As if the Hmong didn’t have things bad enough by being disproportionately killed during</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="175.04" dur="5.03">the war — the Hmong soldiers died ten times more often than their US counterparts — they</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="180.07" dur="2.28">also ended up being persecuted in their own country.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="182.35" dur="4.719">When Laos became Communist, it saw the Hmong soldiers as traitors for fighting against</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="187.069" dur="1.14">Vietnam.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="188.209" dur="4.421">Many ended up fleeing to the US, along with refugees from Cambodia and Vietnam.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="192.63" dur="4.08">In fact, the patient who died in a refugee camp under the supervision of medics was the</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="196.71" dur="3.23">fourth Hmong man to die in the US over a nine-month period.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="199.94" dur="6.21">And, between 1981 and 1988, more than a hundred men from Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia died</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="206.15" dur="1.91">mysteriously in their sleep.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="208.06" dur="3.69">It might have just been a coincidence, but it’s pretty unusual for healthy and young</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="211.75" dur="3.25">people to die in their sleep with no explanation.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="215" dur="2.989">Almost everyone who died was in their 20s and 30s.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="217.989" dur="3.661">Even more creepily, almost all the victims were men and boys.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="221.65" dur="1.54">Only one female died.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="223.19" dur="1.799">What was it about young Asian males?</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="224.989" dur="4.661">And the story of one young boy makes the whole situation sound even more ominous than it</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="229.65" dur="1.06">already does….</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="230.71" dur="4.41">If you’re even mildly into horror movies, this story might sound familiar.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="235.12" dur="4.28">That’s because the mysterious so-called Asian Death Syndrome became the inspiration</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="239.4" dur="2.14">for A Nightmare on Elm Street.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="241.54" dur="3.55">After the film director Wes Craven heard the story in the news one day, he realized it</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="245.09" dur="2.39">would make the perfect plot for a horror film.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="247.48" dur="4.069">So, if you ever watch the film and Freddy Krueger is freaking you out, it’s no use</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="251.549" dur="2.751">reassuring yourself that it’s “just a story.”</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="254.3" dur="1.139">Sorry, but no it ain’t.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="255.439" dur="3.58">Whilst I’m at it, I may as well hurl some more creepy facts at you.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="259.019" dur="4.101">Kraven also based the character of Freddy Krueger on two people he knew in real life.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="263.12" dur="5.06">The name Freddy Krueger was inspired by a childhood bully, Fred Kruge, who tormented</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="268.18" dur="1.73">Craven when he was a child.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="269.91" dur="4.95">And his appearance and overall vibe came about after Kraven was a boy at home one day and</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="274.86" dur="2.649">saw a strange-looking old man walk past.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="277.509" dur="5.471">The two locked eyes, and bizarrely, the man came closer and stood outside his window,</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="282.98" dur="1.1">staring at him.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="284.08" dur="4.74">After a few tense moments, the old man walked away, but he obviously left a lasting impression.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="288.82" dur="3.04">Damn, and I thought I had a twisted sense of humor.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="291.86" dur="1.56">But back to the killer dream outbreak.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="293.42" dur="4.07">The story about the man who died in his sleep might have been mysterious, but it’s nowhere</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="297.49" dur="1.89">near as chilling as this one.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="299.38" dur="4.6">A Cambodian family fled from the genocide to the United States in the 1970s, ready to</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="303.98" dur="1">start a new life.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="304.98" dur="3.67">There was just one problem: the son started having nightmares.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="308.65" dur="2.19">Just like the beginning of many good horror movies.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="310.84" dur="2.4">The boy dreamed of being chased and woke up terrified.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="313.24" dur="4.709">We’ve all had creepy dreams about someone running after us, but I guess his were a notch</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="317.949" dur="4.091">above the standard nightmare, because they freaked him out so much that he avoided sleeping</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="322.04" dur="1">altogether.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="323.04" dur="3.87">Literally, he’d force himself to go days on end without sleeping.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="326.91" dur="2.46">He must have drunk a lot of coffee.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="329.37" dur="2.32">His parents were concerned, for obvious reasons.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="331.69" dur="2.44">They tried to coax him into sleeping, to no avail.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="334.13" dur="3.45">This kid was convinced that, if he fell asleep, he’d die.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="337.58" dur="3.14">From an outsider’s perspective, it all sounds a bit melodramatic.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="340.72" dur="2.569">Maybe the kid needed some attention from his parents or something.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="343.289" dur="3.041">But bizarrely, it turned out that he wasn’t overreacting.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="346.33" dur="4.83">No matter how much double Espresso you drink, you will eventually need to sleep.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="351.16" dur="3.5">Well, despite his determination, this boy was no exception.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="354.66" dur="1.58">One day, he fell asleep.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="356.24" dur="3.769">His parents were relieved, thinking they could finally convince him he was safe whilst he</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="360.009" dur="3.331">slept and the demons from his dreams could never hurt him in real life.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="363.34" dur="1.18">Oh, the irony.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="364.52" dur="4.39">Rinse and repeat — the boy fell asleep, he had a nightmare, and he started screaming.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="368.91" dur="3.72">His parents rushed in to comfort him — only to find out that he’d already died.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="372.63" dur="4.39">Incredibly, his nightmare had killed him, just like the other hundred men from Laos,</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="377.02" dur="1.5">Cambodia, and Vietnam.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="378.52" dur="4.71">It made the perfect plot for a horror film — a young child who sensed danger and logical</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="383.23" dur="3.14">adults who refused to believe his absurd theories.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="386.37" dur="2.85">But how was it possible that a young boy could die in his sleep?</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="389.22" dur="4.539">Surely there’s a logical explanation that doesn’t involve a demon like Freddy Krueger?</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="393.759" dur="3.361">Investigators tried and failed to find a medical cause of the deaths.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="397.12" dur="4.84">They found some links with an irregular heartbeat, but nobody knew what the cause of the irregular</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="401.96" dur="1.29">heartbeat was.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="403.25" dur="2.44">Since then, there have been a few more theories.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="405.69" dur="4.28">One explanation was that the refugees were exposed to chemical nerve agents used during</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="409.97" dur="1.13">the Vietnam war.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="411.1" dur="4.53">It sounds mildly logical, but no doctors could find any actual evidence for it.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="415.63" dur="4.06">Besides, even if the idea made some scientific sense — which it didn’t — it failed</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="419.69" dur="4.5">to explain why the nerve agent would only affect males and only during the night.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="424.19" dur="4.09">Another idea was that the night terrors were a symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder,</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="428.28" dur="4.789">provoked by the horrific experiences of the refugees and the unfamiliar world they entered</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="433.069" dur="1.121">in the USA.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="434.19" dur="4.11">But again, even though this makes some sense, there was no proper evidence for it and no</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="438.3" dur="3.39">explanation why females didn’t also suffer from PTSD.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="441.69" dur="2.03">So, back to the drawing board.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="443.72" dur="3.979">Ever heard that old wive’s tale that if we die in a dream then we also die in real</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="447.699" dur="3.81">life, so we always wake up from nightmares a few fractions of a second before we’re</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="451.509" dur="1">about to die?</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="452.509" dur="3.831">Sorry to disappoint — or maybe it’s a source of relief — but that’s not true.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="456.34" dur="3.44">It’s true that, when things happen in a dream, they can trigger us to have the same</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="459.78" dur="2.63">physiological reactions in our waking state.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="462.41" dur="3.73">Kind of like when you’re screaming in your dream then you wake up to find you’re really</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="466.14" dur="1">screaming.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="467.14" dur="4.179">Or when you urinate in your dream and then you wake up and realize you — oh, come on,</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="471.319" dur="1.581">please say it’s not just me.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="472.9" dur="4.44">Basically, it’s theoretically possible that a dream could trigger a physiological reaction</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="477.34" dur="1.609">that ends with you dying.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="478.949" dur="4.661">When people die suddenly in their sleep, it’s put down to Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="483.61" dur="1">Syndrome.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="484.61" dur="2.24">There’s a nice piece of medical jargon for you.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="486.85" dur="4.34">Some academic studies think this phenomenon could be biological or genetic, explaining</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="491.19" dur="3.42">why people of the same ethnicity, age, and sex died.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="494.61" dur="4.19">Also known as Brugada syndrome, the disease is actually the most common cause of natural</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="498.8" dur="2.269">death amongst the young, healthy Asian population.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="501.069" dur="5.231">It’s a rare heart rhythm disorder that can lead to sudden cardiac arrest, meaning a loss</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="506.3" dur="1.869">of heart function, breathing, and consciousness.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="508.169" dur="4.131">It can happen whilst people are awake, but is most fatal whilst they’re sleeping.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="512.3" dur="1">Yeah, I know.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="513.3" dur="5.13">A rare genetic disease is kind of an anticlimax compared to a spooky grim reaper entering</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="518.43" dur="1">kids’ nightmares.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="519.43" dur="1.64">But we still don’t know everything.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="521.07" dur="4.329">Since the peak in the mid and late 1980s, deaths from Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="525.399" dur="4.921">Syndrome, Brugada syndrome, or whatever else you want to call it, have decreased sharply.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="530.32" dur="4.23">Nobody can fully explain the decrease, so we can’t rule out any funny business or</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="534.55" dur="1.62">grim reapers quite yet.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="536.17" dur="2.07">Anyway, it’s getting late.</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="538.24" dur="1">Time to get some sleep...</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="539.24" dur="5.57">Or, check out our videos “scientists reveal how dreams can kill you in real life” or</text>
<text sub="clublinks" start="544.81" dur="2.25">“night hag, the demon that visits you in your sleep.”</text>